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So What’s the Deal with Groupon? 8 Things for Groupon to Work On in Order to Survive

by EOS Intelligence

So What’s the Deal with Groupon? 8 Things for Groupon to Work On in Order to Survive

by EOS Intelligence

by EOS Intelligence
347views

Over the past few years, Groupon has managed to build a recognizable brand, and currently claims to have attracted 250,000 merchants and over 200 million subscribers globally, with some 40 million active customers (as of November 2012). Undoubtedly, these are valuable assets and such considerable customer and merchant base offers great potential, yet the company’s market cap fell by about 80% since its IPO, from US$16.7 billion in November 2011 down to US$2.8 billion in December 2012. Is Groupon’s heyday over for good?

Recently, there has been discussion around Groupon’s future, triggered by the rather consistent decline in the company’s shares price (from around US$26 on Groupon’s IPO down to US$4.5 in December 2012), increased discontentment on the customer side, and disappointment on the merchant side. Given its declining market cap linked to slowdown in revenue growth, fall in sales volume to existing customers and shrinking sales force, clearly, Groupon is currently not the best target for potential takeovers.

Groupon’s service novelty status that drove the company’s success in the first place, seems to be wearing off for its customers, especially as competition is intensifying, with similar daily-deal websites proliferating thanks to low entry barriers. Nevertheless, Groupon seems to be keeping its head high, trying to introduce more or less successful measures to drive customer interest and retain merchants (e.g. the moderately successful Groupon NOW drive offering nearby deals on demand for use on the same day).

While some of the initiatives might allow Groupon to marginally rebound, it does not seem they will bring the company back to its glory days. Groupon’s executives should revamp several aspects of their business (perhaps previously missed or underestimated) – aspects that currently appear critical for Groupon to survive:

  1. Revisit Groupon’s model key selling points – perhaps Groupon got it a bit wrong in the beginning and conveyed it incorrectly to merchants, luring them with the idea of super-cheap offers turning masses of first-time-consumers into masses of regulars. Some customers will establish long lasting relationship with certain merchants, but such conversions proved to hold only a small share in overall purchases. Therefore, this should not be the main selling proposition to merchants, as this leads to disappointment and merchant expectations are not met.

  2. Understand your customers – consumers are always looking for discounts, but many purchases via Groupon come from customer willingness to try something new once – something that they would typically not be able to afford at full price. For such customers, the assumption of them turning into regular customers after trying a product is flawed, as they are unlikely to continue purchasing at full price. The only conversion rate that might occur here, is the conversion from trying-how-Groupon-works-for-me customer into Groupon-regular customer, which does not bring any benefit to merchants, thus fails to justify merchant’s relationship with Groupon.

  3. Re-orient merchants’ approach and re-shape their expectations – offering mass deals at very slim or zero margin is not going to work for merchants at all, given that only small fraction of customers MIGHT turn into regular customers. Groupon must make sure that merchants see real value in the relationship with Groupon, not just a vague promise of potentially (read: maybe, maybe not) expanding customers base as a way to organically grow merchant’s business.

  4. Indicate the real value proposition to merchants – merchants should be clear about the tangible benefits of working with Groupon:

    • For product merchants, Groupon can be a great tool for selling excess or old capacity e.g. during low demand season (discounted winter sports equipment in summer, unsold end-of-line products) or getting rid of old stock before restocking for anticipated rush periods with products that could be sold off-Groupon-route at higher margin. Whatever the reason, merchants must ensure the products offered are original product quality and without defects.

    • For service merchants, Groupon can be ideal for filling in off-peak times through discounted restaurant vouchers for weekdays or morning spa sessions. Customers are likely to understand the link between discount and non-peak time, provided that the service level is consistently high with the service they would receive during peak time. This can allow to maintain continuity of orders and utilize the merchant’s resources in times when they are largely idle and generate nothing but costs.

    • Regardless of merchant’s business orientation, Groupon can be positioned as a tool for getting quick cash by merchant at times when improving cash liquidity takes priority over generating profits due to temporary operational circumstances.

    • Groupon can be used to fuel new product trial for newly launched or novelty products and services, especially expensive ones, where the high full price and unfamiliarity with the offering would normally deter customers from trying the product or service.

  5. Control the number of groupons released on a single product or service at once – with large numbers of vouchers released, the merchant is flooded with more orders than that can be processed without delay or with dozens of consumers wanting to use the service over short span of time right after groupons’ release. Experience shows that this often leads to delays in delivery, giving the first-time-customer wrong impression of the overall level of service, causing disappointment, and reducing the likelihood of first-time-customers converting into regular customers even further.

  6. Ensure that Groupon customers are treated as normal customers by merchants – treating the customer with groupons in their hand as a worse sort of customer is a common sin of merchants (service merchants in particular). They tend to forget that serving such customers is their only chance to showcase the excellence of service and customer care, and create memorably great experience. Instead, customers are reminded that they are getting less as they paid less, which lowers the chance of customers returning to purchase the service at a full price.

  7. Ensure that Groupon deals are real deals – consumers are smart and given the easy access to online tools allowing for price comparison, they are likely to wise up to the so-called original price being inflated, and the discounted price being the actual price. Such discovery by the consumer leads them to feeling tricked, and they lose trust and interest, probably for good.

  8. Keep it clear and play fair – do not discourage consumers with unclear, confusing or hidden statements on limitations in using the groupons. Including such conditions in small grey print at the bottom of the page is not enough. Customers often discover these limitations only after purchasing the groupon, finding themselves feeling disappointed and deceived. The conversion rate for such customers is obviously close to none, with some of them also creating negative word of mouth for such a merchant.

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