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by EOS Intelligence EOS Intelligence No Comments

Commentary: Bridging the Gap between MDx Testing and Point-of-care

The COVID-19 pandemic brought innovation and investment to the in vitro diagnostics (IVD) market, opening new pathways to simplify and expand testing. The previously complicated and time-consuming molecular testing gradually started moving towards rapid testing, changing how we manage healthcare. The growing popularity of rapid testing gave way to self-sampling and at-home sampling, which is set to bring molecular testing closer to patients. Another noticeable transformation the industry witnessed post-pandemic was the rise of molecular testing at point-of-care (POC), which is set to disrupt the way clinicians deliver accurate diagnoses in record time.

The latest generation of IVD devices is focused on providing quick diagnosis and being cost-effective. This has led to IVD companies focusing on developing simpler and less invasive sample collection methods, such as self-sampling tests.

IVD innovation is also transforming molecular testing to make healthcare more accessible. To a certain extent, dependence on laboratories is gradually decreasing with molecular testing available at POC. A key development in this area is the use of multiplex assay, which allows to test for multiple pathogens simultaneously, allowing for early diagnosis.

Molecular testing moving near-patient

After using antigen tests during COVID-19, demand for molecular testing for a variety of diseases at POC has risen drastically. In 2023, the industry faced an acute shortage of skilled laboratory staff, further increasing the need for molecular testing to move near-patient. This has resulted in physicians and patients preferring molecular tests at POC (MPOC). Some prominent industry players, such as Cepheid, Abbott, and BioFire, offer CLIA-waived PCR instruments and multiplex assay tests for the POC setting. A CLIA-waived certification allows tests to be performed at a doctor’s office by a non-technician instead of other more complex MDx tests requiring specialized technicians.

Moving these multiplex molecular tests near-patient is revamping the IVD landscape, positively impacting both the patients and payers. Early diagnosis with POC diagnostics empowers physicians with evidence-based decision-making at an early stage. Moreover, with multiplex assays increasingly being used for MPOC and delivering results within 10-25 minutes (in the case of respiratory assays), the wait time for patients to receive the correct diagnosis has reduced substantially. This results in clinicians being able to start with proper treatment on the patient’s first visit, thus reducing the total number of patient visits. Consequently, physicians are also able to accommodate a higher number of patients.

In fact, MPOC could become a critical element of the value-based care model in the USA. The value-based program incentivizes healthcare providers/physicians to provide quality healthcare. With MPOC offering quicker turnaround time and lower testing costs, physicians/payers will likely be better incentivized and motivated to deliver high-quality services.

Growing demand for self-sampling/at-home sampling

The pandemic raised public awareness regarding the use of self-sampling kits and increased demand for them. Further, the FDA granted Emergency Use Authorization to multiple assays during the pandemic to quickly onboard self-test kits and penetrate the US households with this novel testing method.

Driven by the convenience, cost-effectiveness, and accessibility offered by self-sampling kits, they are becoming increasingly popular, particularly amongst the aging population that needs tools and technologies to manage health at home. It is also proving to be a sustainable testing method, as it can be used for preventative screening as well as allows for discretion for patients who may not prefer to get tested in a laboratory or by a physician, particularly in case of sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Additionally, unlike OTC tests, molecular diagnostic tests allow for better accuracy in results and are recognized by the FDA for clinical diagnosis use. This has given confidence to healthcare providers to advocate self-sampling, as they stand to benefit from bringing care to patients’ homes, eventually reducing healthcare expenses. In a value-based setting, at-home testing proves to particularly benefit physicians who are able to eliminate unnecessary patient visits.

For the prominent industry players, at-home testing represents a key opportunity area to grow in the niche direct-to-consumer testing segment. Companies are also using these tests as an opportunity to target the rural population who do not have easy access to laboratories. Besides infectious and respiratory diseases, companies are now trying to foray into other treatment areas, such as human papillomavirus (HPV). Self-sample collection for HPV has begun in Europe with BD’s Onclarity HPV assay.

EOS Perspective

Establishing a strong foothold in both self-sampling and MPOC segments is seen as a sizeable business opportunity for stakeholders of the IVD market. In the near term, it is likely for the IVD players to continue launching new assays and technologies to expand offerings.

For self-sampling, MDx players have been focusing on infectious diseases, and there still is a vast untapped market for self-sampling at home, specifically when testing for STIs. In November 2023, LetsGetChecked became the first company to secure FDA approval for chlamydia and gonorrhea at-home sample collection. This has opened doors for other players to enter this niche market, and they are likely to jump on the bandwagon by seeking FDA approvals for their STIs self-sampling kits. Major players, such as Hologic, are already gathering data to launch a self-collection device for STIs. Hologic’s Aptima Swab for STIs multi-testing is approved in the EU, and the company is now conducting trials to get approval in the USA.

In the near term, a noticeable trend in the MPOC segment is expected to be the focus of MDx players on developing multiplex assays that follow the ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach. There is a growing demand from physicians for multiplex assays that allow them to test for multiple viruses and deliver results in under four hours. Companies have already started to take matters into their own hands by focusing their R&D efforts on developing panels and preparing them for FDA approval and CLIA waiver. Becton Dickinson announced the launch of its first molecular diagnostics POC instrument, BD Elience, by 2025. The device is expected to allow panel testing for respiratory and sexually transmitted diseases.

Although the self-sampling and MPOC segments present many opportunities for the IVD stakeholders, some roadblocks may hinder their development and adoption. For instance, multiplex assay reimbursement schemes may hamper their widespread adoption in the POC setting. Per the latest guidelines, reimbursement schemes for multiplex assays are less favorable than those for singleplex assays. Furthermore, at present, there are no reimbursement schemes in place to reimburse for self-sampling at home, so patients are required to pay out-of-pocket.

Several players face a crucial challenge for at-home collection: proving to the FDA that the self-sample collected is not contaminated or poorly taken. FDA requirements for approval of these tests are very stringent and demand that companies prove the adequacy of the sample collected by patients to match that of laboratory collection.

Despite these challenges, self-sampling and MPOC present untapped opportunities for many IVD players seeking to expand their capabilities and offerings to position themselves better in the MDx market.

by EOS Intelligence EOS Intelligence No Comments

Vaccines in Africa: Pursuit of Reducing Over-Dependence on Imports

Pandemics such as COVID-19, Ebola, and the 2009 influenza instilled the need for a well-equipped domestic vaccine manufacturing industry in the minds of African leaders. Currently, due to insufficient local production, the continent depends heavily on imports from other countries, with the imports satisfying about 99% of vaccine demand in the continent. However, thanks to recent significant FDI, the vaccine industry in Africa had a market potential of around US$1.3 billion as of 2021 and is expected to range between US$2.3 billion and US$5.4 billion by 2030, as per McKinsey estimates.

Vaccine sovereignty is the need of the hour for the African continent

One of the most important lessons the COVID-19 pandemic has given to Africa is the pressing need to ramp up vaccine production locally. Biotech firms, such as Moderna and Pfizer, developed COVID-19 vaccines faster than any other producers. However, these vaccines were not easily accessible to most African countries.

Africans, in general, lack access to affordable and quality healthcare. Preventable diseases, such as pneumonia, malaria, and typhoid fever, have high fatality rates across the continent. This calls for localized production of pharmaceuticals and vaccines to lower the economic burden of these diseases and facilitate better access to affordable healthcare.

Currently, Africa relies heavily on other countries, such as China and India, for its pharmaceutical needs. The paucity of localized pharma production aggravates healthcare and vaccine inequity across the continent. To substantiate this, the COVID-19 vaccination rate at the beginning of 2022 in 16 African countries was less than 5% on average.

Currently, Africa consumes around 25% of the global vaccine production, whereas it produces less than 1% of its vaccine needs locally, as per the African Union (AU). Therefore, a lot remains to be done to materialize the goal of achieving 60% of vaccine needs to be satisfied locally by 2040, the vision of the Partnerships for African Vaccine Manufacturing (PAVM) under Africa CDC.

Increasing the vaccine production capacity from 1% to 60% in 15-16 years is not an easy task. Considering this, PAVM designed a continental plan for creating a vaccine production ecosystem capable of achieving the 60% target. This plan, called the PAVM Framework for Action (PAVM FFA), assessed that the African vaccine manufacturing industry would be expected to have increased the number of their vaccine production factories from 13 in 2023 to 23 (11 form, fill, finish, or F&F factories and 12 end-to-end factories) by 2040 providing a total of 22 priority products by 2040. It will require dedicated efforts from all involved stakeholders, such as producers, biopharma companies, industry associations, regulatory bodies, and academia.

Vaccines in Africa Pursuit of Reducing Over-Dependence on Imports by EOS Intelligence

Vaccines in Africa Pursuit of Reducing Over-Dependence on Imports by EOS Intelligence

Significant FDI will aid in driving localized vaccine production in Africa

The continent is attracting considerable FDI from the USA and Europe for vaccine development. Several foreign biotechnology firms are partnering with African governments to venture into localized vaccine production.

In March 2023, US-based biotechnology company Moderna partnered with the Kenyan government to set up a production facility for making messenger RNA (mRNA). The proposed annual capacity of Moderna’s first-ever facility in Africa is around 500 million doses of vaccines. The facility is expected to produce drug substances or active pharmaceutical ingredients and the final product for the entire continent.

In another example, a Germany-based biotechnology company, BioNTech, is contemplating commencing production of mRNA-based vaccines in its Rwanda facility in 2025. The construction of the facility began in 2022. With an investment of around US$150 million, this is Africa’s first mRNA manufacturing facility built by a foreign company. The proposed annual capacity of BioNTech’s mRNA facility is about 50 million vaccine doses. BioNTech also plans to set up mRNA factories in other African countries, such as South Africa and Senegal, and plans to produce vaccines for malaria, tuberculosis, HSV-2, and HIV in the future.

In September 2023, the South African government partnered with the KfW Development Bank of Germany. As per the agreement, South Africa will receive €20 million from Germany’s KfW Development Bank over five years for developing and manufacturing mRNA vaccines. The fund will be utilized for equipment procurement and API certification for vaccine production in South Africa.

A consortium of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations (GAVI), AU, and Africa CDC established the African Vaccine Manufacturing Accelerator (AVMA) with the intent of fostering a sustainable vaccine industry. The formation of AVMA involved donors, partners, industry stakeholders, and non-governmental and not-for-profit organizations. GAVI planned to expand its supplier base, mainly in Africa, in 2021. Furthermore, the global alliance announced the commencement of around 30 vaccine manufacturing projects across 14 African countries.

Moreover, as of December 2023, over US$1.8 billion is planned for investment by a collaboration between the French government, Africa CDC, and other European and international investors to streamline the development and production of vaccines across the continent.

Desire to ensure vaccine effectiveness is seen as a biased vaccine preference

African governments are not only proactively putting in dedicated efforts to attract considerable FDI to build and strengthen the continent’s vaccine manufacturing industry, but they also focus on good quality, effective vaccine types. However, some perceive this as a lack of interest from the African governments to buy non-mRNA vaccines made by local companies.

To cite an example, Aspen Pharmacare, a South Africa-based biotechnology company, put significant investments in ramping up the capacity of its manufacturing facility to produce viral vector vaccines against COVID-19. The company announced in November 2020 that it would be formulating, filling, and packaging the COVID-19 vector vaccine made by J&J. It also received €1.56 million investment from Belgian investors, BIO, the Belgian Investment Company for Developing Countries, which is a JV between the European Investment Bank (EIB) and several European DFIs.

However, millions of J&J COVID-19 vaccine doses made in South Africa were exported to Europe by J&J without the knowledge of the South African government, to support Europe’s domestic vaccine demand in August 2021, not complying with the initial agreement of vaccine distribution within the African continent. This created a political impasse between European and African governments over the distribution of the vaccines, which, in turn, delayed their production as the standoff resulted in a long waiting time for Aspen Pharmacare to produce the COVID-19 vaccine.

Ultimately, by September 2021, the European countries agreed to return 90% of the J&J vaccines to Africa. In March 2022, J&J gave Aspen Pharmacare the license to manufacture and distribute the vaccine under its brand name, Aspenovax. The expected production capacity of Aspenovax was around 400 million doses. However, not a single order came from African governments.

According to Health Policy Watch News, the reason for this was the rising production of Pfizer and Moderna’s mRNA COVID-19 vaccine distributed by COVAX that was being opted for by most African governments. Thus, in August 2022, Aspen Pharmacare had to close its production line, stating non-existent demand in Africa, partly due to the subsidence of the pandemic and partly due to African governments’ lack of interest in non-mRNA vaccines. The company could not sell a single dose of the vaccine, owing to multiple factors, starting from what was perceived as the lack of government’s intent to purchase home-grown vaccines to delayed production due to the Europe-Africa political clash and the rising inclination of the world towards mRNA vaccines.

It is interesting to note that of the total Covid-19 vaccines Africa administered to its residents, 36% were J&J vector vaccines, shipped directly from the USA.

Technology transfer hub and know-how development initiatives are set

To strengthen vaccine production capacity in low and middle-income countries (LMICs), the WHO declared the establishment of a technology transfer hub in Cape Town, South Africa, in June 2021. In February 2022, WHO said that Nigeria, Kenya, Senegal, Tunisia, and South Africa will be among the first African countries to get the necessary technical expertise and training from the technology transfer hub to make mRNA vaccines in Africa.

Afrigen Biologics, a South Africa-based biotech firm, is leading this initiative. As Moderna did not enforce patents on its mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, Afrigen Biologics could successfully reproduce the former company’s vaccine, capitalizing on the data available in the public domain. As per an article published in October 2023, Afrigen Biologics reached a stage where its vaccine production capabilities are appropriate for “phase 1/2 clinical trial material production”. Additionally, in collaboration with a Denmark-based biotech firm, Evaxion, Afrigen is developing a new mRNA gonorrhea vaccine.

Besides setting up a technology transfer hub in South Africa, academic institutions are partnering with non-profits as well as companies to reinforce the development of necessary technical know-how and training required for vaccine manufacturing. One such example is the development of vaccines in Africa under the partnership of Dakar, Senegal-based Pasteur Institute (IPD), and Mastercard Foundation. Approved in June 2023, the goal of MADIBA (Manufacturing in Africa for Disease Immunization and Building Autonomy) includes improving biomanufacturing in the continent by training a dedicated staff for MADIBA and other vaccine producers from Africa, partnering with African universities, and fostering science education amongst African students.


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Inflated COVID-19 Tests Prices in Africa

Although significant initiatives are underway, challenges exist

With 13 vaccine manufacturing companies and academic organizations across eight African countries, the continent’s vaccine industry is in its infancy. However, the current vaccine manufacturing landscape includes a mix of facilities with capabilities in F&F (10 facilities), R&D (3 facilities), and drug substance (DS) or active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) development (5 facilities).

One of the challenges African vaccine producers face is not being able to become profitable in the long run. In 2023, a global consulting firm, BCG, in collaboration with BioVac, a South Africa-based biopharmaceutical company, and Wellcome, a UK-based charitable trust that focuses on research in the healthcare sector, conducted a detailed survey exploring stakeholder perspectives on challenges and feasible solutions. The respondent pool consisted of a diverse set of stakeholders spanning across Africa (43%), LMICs (11%), and global (46%). A total of 63 respondents from various backgrounds, such as manufacturers, industry associations, health organizations, regulators, and academic organizations, were interviewed across the regions above. According to this research, most vaccine producers in Africa who were interviewed said that profitability is one of their key concerns. This leads to a lack of foreign investments required for scaling up, which in turn creates insufficient production capacity, thereby increasing the prices of vaccines. Therefore, these producers are unable to meet considerable demand for their products, and their business model becomes unsustainable.

Continued commitment and support from all stakeholders are necessary for achieving a sustainable business model for vaccine producers in Africa and, consequently, for the industry at large. However, it has been observed that the support from global, continental, and national levels of governments and other non-government stakeholders, such as investors, donors, partners, etc., tend to diminish with the declining rampage caused by epidemics in Africa. Therefore, this poses a severe challenge to strengthening the vaccine production industry in Africa.

In another 2023 study, by a collaboration between the African CDC, the Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI), a global non-profit health organization, and PATH, formerly known as the Program for Appropriate Technology in Health, involving 19 vaccine manufacturers in Africa, it was suggested that the current vaccine production capacity including current orders to form/fill/ finish using imported antigens is nearly 2 billion doses. In contrast, the current average vaccine demand is 1.3 billion doses annually. In addition, there is a proposed F&F capacity of over 2 billion doses. Thus, if Africa can materialize both current and proposed plans of producing F&F capacity vaccines from imported antigens, the study concludes that the continent will reach a capacity of more than double the forecasted vaccine demand in 2030. Overcapacity will lead to losses due to wastage. Thus, not all vaccine producers will be profitable in the long term. This may challenge the African vaccine manufacturing industry to be profitable.

Moreover, Africa’s current domestic antigen production capacity is lower than what is required to meet PAVM’s vaccine production target of 60% by 2040. In addition, a large part of the existing capacity of antigens is being utilized to make non-vaccine products. Although antigen production plans are underway, these will not suffice to narrow the gap between demand and production of antigens domestically in Africa.

EOS Perspective

To create a local, financially sustainable vaccine manufacturing industry with output adequate to support the continent’s needs, it is necessary to create an environment in which producers can achieve profitability.

Initiatives such as technology transfers and funding will only be fruitful when their on-the-ground implementation is successful. This will require the involvement of all stakeholders, from the state governments to bodies that approve the market entry of vaccines. All stakeholders need to be steadfast in their actions to achieve the ambitious target of 60% of vaccine needs to be met from local production by 2040 without compromising on the accuracy and quality of the vaccines.

One of the most vital aspects of the necessary planning is for stakeholders to ensure that even after the pandemic and its aftermath are entirely gone, the effort towards establishing facilities, creating know-how, and training a workforce skilled in vaccine development and production does not stop.

The focus should extend beyond COVID-19, as there are many other preventable diseases in Africa, such as malaria, pneumonia, tuberculosis, and STDs, against which vaccines are not yet produced locally. These areas provide a great opportunity for vaccine producers and associated stakeholders to continue being interested and involved in vaccine production and development in Africa.

by EOS Intelligence EOS Intelligence No Comments

Commentary: Opioid Epidemic in the USA – Is the War to Curb the Crisis Turning Futile?

The opioid crisis in the USA is believed to have begun in the 1990s with the overprescription of pain-relieving medicines. However, the epidemic gained steam recently with the availability of cheap heroin, fentanyl, and other synthetic opioids in the USA that foreign drug cartels from Mexico and China predominantly provide. According to a report by the US Congress Joint Economic Committee (JEC), the economic burden caused by the opioid crisis in the USA is to the tune of US$ 1.5 trillion in 2020, a 37% increase from 2017 when the CDC last reported it. This translates to 7% of the country’s GDP in 2020, indicating that the problem cannot be ignored.

The death toll owing to the opioid epidemic has tripled from 2016 to 2021, as per research by Yale University. In terms of human deaths, over 1,500 Americans die per week from taking some form of opioid. The overall death toll owing to opioid overdose was 80,411 in 2021.

Although the US government has taken initiatives to curb the crisis, such as increasing the federal, state, and local governments’ investments in drug treatment and prevention programs, a lot more needs to be done in the field of foreign policy and drug approval control, among others.

Federal action to control the opioid epidemic is underway, but more efforts are needed

From funding treatment programs and addiction prevention tools to focusing on a harm-reduction approach that lays importance on life-saving drugs and tools that could reverse opioid overdose, the US government has recently taken significant measures to curb the opioid crisis in the country.

Government grants and monetary aid

To begin with, the federal, state, and local governments have increased funding for the treatment and prevention programs for opioid use disorder. The Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act was passed in 2016 to combat the opioid crisis in the USA. It was a six-pronged strategy with pillars: prevention, treatment, recovery, law enforcement, criminal justice reform, and overdose reversal.

In monetary grants provided by the federal government, a sum of US$1.8 billion was given to states to combat the opioid crisis in 2019. Grants of US$900 million were given to the CDC over three years to facilitate the monitoring of overdose data and subsequently design strategies for treatment in states and counties/localities.

In addition, US$932 million was given to all 50 states in State Opioid Response grants in 2019. In 2021, the Biden government and the American Rescue Plan Act (ARP) provided US$5.5 billion for mental health and substance abuse prevention. In 2022, the sum was increased to US$1.5 billion for the State Opioid Response grants.

Apart from grants given by the federal government, some states and counties/localities utilized the Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds (SLFRF) from the ARP for developing programs to improve behavioral health, prevent opioid addiction, and treatment strategies for opioid use disorder. The SLFRF was to the tune of US$350 billion that was given to the state, territorial, local, and tribal governments across the USA to help them respond to and recover from COVID-19.

Drug control policies

In addition to monetary aid, the federal government brought about changes in drug control policies. For example, in April 2022, the Biden government introduced the National Drug Control Strategy that focused on a harm reduction approach that advocates using life-saving tools such as naloxone, drug test strips, and syringe services programs. It also promotes evidence-based treatment for those who are at a high risk of an overdose and improvement of the data and research systems for seamless development of drug policies.

With the FDA approval of the naloxone nasal spray Narcan in March 2023, it became the first OTC drug in the USA to reverse fentanyl overdoses. Narcan began to be sold to the public by September 2023.

Foreign policies

The US federal government has worked together with the government of Mexico for decades to curb the flow of illicit drugs entering the USA. To cite an example, through the Merida Initiative, the USA gave Mexico monetary aid of US$3.5 billion between 2008 and 2021 to counter the smuggling of illegal drugs across borders.

In the second half of 2021, the Biden government announced synthetic-opioid peddling a national emergency. The federal government also signed two executive orders that allowed the Biden administration to sanction individuals and bodies involved in the creation and distribution of fentanyl.

The 2022 National Drug Control Strategy also laid down policies to minimize the supply of illegal drugs through domestic and international collaboration.

In the second half of 2023, the federal government sanctioned 25 companies and individuals based in China who were suspected to be associated with the production of fentanyl precursor chemicals. Furthermore, the Biden government added China to the US list of countries involved in the creation and distribution of illegal drugs. This list comprises 22 other countries, such as Colombia, Mexico, and India.

In addition to this, the Biden government has continued to put pressure on Mexico to seize fentanyl precursor chemicals obtained from China and eradicate secret laboratories in Mexico. In November 2023, president Biden agreed with the Chinese and Mexican presidents separately to improve bilateral cooperation to prevent the production and dissemination of illegal fentanyl.

Domestic control measures

Apart from international efforts, federal action is being taken to control illegal opioid dissemination domestically. For instance, regulations have been put in place to revise the limits on opioid prescriptions, to prioritize seizing fentanyl, and to create widespread awareness of fentanyl’s lethality. Compared to 2021, the Drug Enforcement Administration of the USA seized double the quantity of fentanyl in 2022, and it announced that 60% of fake prescription drugs possess a lethal dose of fentanyl.

EOS Perspective

The JEC estimates of the US opioid crisis cost of US$1.5 trillion in 2020 speak volumes about the scope and size of the federal action needed to combat the epidemic. The magnitude of the opioid crisis in the USA calls for concrete action from the federal, state, and local governments to decrease both the death toll and the economic burden.

The federal government should promote the increase of access to evidence-based treatment by eradicating the barriers to healthcare and continue to embrace the “treatment over punishment” approach, focusing on medical attention and support instead of imprisonment. Another step is to enable the Medicaid expansion of the 12 states that have yet to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. This will lead to higher access to treatment, thereby minimizing the fatality rate.

Furthermore, the federal government should fund the Overdose Data to Action program for the expanded opioid data collection on overdose deaths in all US states. This will aid researchers and policymakers in arriving at the socioeconomic cost and aftermath of the opioid epidemic to understand better and resolve the problem. The federal government should also take initiatives to reduce the societal stigma around substance abuse for higher enrollment in treatment services.

Moreover, the federal government needs to address Narcan’s cost and accessibility challenges in the USA for better reach and impact. More R&D, increased border inspection, better overdose prevention, and employee assistance programs are instrumental in controlling the opioid epidemic in a better way.

Allocation of funds, increasing access to treatment, and enhancing the understanding of the scale of the epidemic are crucial steps in decreasing the human and economic toll of the opioid crisis in the USA.

by EOS Intelligence EOS Intelligence 1 Comment

Commentary: Genetic Testing Fraud – The Next Big Concern for the US Healthcare?

Over the past few years, lab fraud has become a concern in the USA with the increase in financial gains obtainable through fraudulent billing practices, unnecessary testing, bundling of expensive tests (such as tests for rare respiratory pathogens or genetic tests) with COVID-19 tests, and increase in the number of genetic testing labs. A recent update in the compliance and regulatory requirements and increased focus on analyzing fraud testing schemes are expected to help curb lab fraud in the country.

Genetic testing, due to its increased use in the healthcare industry, is a particularly lucrative fraud target. Despite the presence of various compliance programs and regulations, several laboratories, together with patient brokers, telemedicine companies, and call centers, commit fraud and defraud Medicare. This strains the healthcare system as it increases healthcare costs and influences the patients’ trust in testing, labs, and other stakeholders.

Clinical labs face less scrutiny than full-service health centers. Thus, they are more frequently involved in lab fraud activities. Some of the most commonly noticed lab fraud cases in the USA include kickback schemes, fraudulent billing, and unnecessary testing, among others. Labs team up with parties such as patient brokers to get patients, doctors to refer patients or prescribe unnecessary tests, telemedicine companies to order tests, and call centers to target Medicare beneficiaries and then defraud Medicare by submitting claims.

Lab fraud in genetic testing has emerged in the USA over the past few years due to sprouting genetic testing labs across the country and the increasing use of such tests in health practices to assist disease diagnosis and predict disease risk. Genetic testing enables healthcare providers to offer personalized medicine based on the individual’s genetic makeup and helps identify how the patient will respond to treatments. Genetic testing fraud, mainly targeting cancer screening, pharmacogenetics, and cardiovascular diseases, is on the rise.

One of many such fraud cases was noted in August 2023, when LabSolutions LLC, based in Georgia, USA, submitted over US$463 million worth of unnecessary genetic and other laboratory tests to Medicare, the national health insurance program, of which Medicare paid over US$187 million. These tests were obtained through kickbacks and bribes. The scale of similar fraud is evident from the fact that in July 2022, the Department of Justice announced criminal charges against 36 defendants in 13 federal districts for more than US$1.2 billion in fraudulent telemedicine, cardiovascular and genetic testing, and durable medical equipment purchases.

The COVID-19 outbreak in 2020 further spiked fraud cases, as it gave an opportunity to bundle COVID-19 testing with other forms of expensive testing that patients did not need, including genetic testing for various diseases and tests for rare respiratory pathogens. Financial incentives offered by the federal government to encourage participation in COVID-19 control-related businesses also attracted fraudsters in the laboratory business. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services report, in May 2023, around 378 labs billed Medicare Part B for add-on COVID-19 tests at high volume and payment amounts. Of these, around 276 labs billed for more add-on tests, such as billing Medicaid for COVID-19 tests alongside respiratory pathogen panels (RPPs), individual respiratory tests (IRTs), allergy tests, and genetic testing. An additional 161 of these 378 labs also reported higher costs than usual for add-on testing.

Lab fraud behind money loss, erosion of trust, and increased insurance premiums

Lab fraud causes a significant adverse effect on the integrity and quality of the healthcare system as unnecessary testing and fraudulent billing practices increase healthcare costs, compromise the accuracy and reliability of diagnostic tests, and erode trust in healthcare providers, including doctors and hospitals, among others. Healthcare providers who unknowingly refer patients to fraudulent labs are also likely to face a reputation hit.

Above all, healthcare fraud can cause tens of billions of dollars in yearly losses. According to the National Health Care Anti-Fraud Association, taxpayers are losing over US$100 billion annually to Medicare and Medicaid fraud, including billing for unapproved COVID-19 tests, genetic testing fraud, home healthcare billing, and fraud billing for medical equipment.

Companies manufacturing genetic testing kits may face reputational damage if their products are used in the genetic testing fraud scheme. This is expected to negatively impact their market presence as customers/patients will lose confidence and will likely move to reputed competitors. Also, healthcare providers may stop referring the company products to their patients.

Increasing fraud will likely drive the need for more stringent regulations for genetic companies manufacturing genetic testing kits (requiring compliance in conducting in-depth clinical studies, providing extensive data, maintaining necessary documentation, labeling and packaging requirements, etc.). This is expected to increase the operational costs for genetic testing companies and, thus, the price of genetic testing services. Ever-increasing genetic testing fraud is expected to potentially disrupt the market’s growth trajectory as patients become more cautious. Individuals are likely to receive tests that are not appropriate or required and may become skeptical about the necessity and accuracy of the test result.


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Commentary: The Promise of Comprehensive Genomic Profiling in the USA

Lab fraud also increases insurance premiums as fraudulent activities increase the cost of claims, which in turn increases insurance companies’ expenses. The insurance companies are bound to raise premiums to cover additional costs. Additionally, individuals receiving genetic testing through fraud schemes will likely be denied future coverage. This is because many genetic tests for inherited diseases are offered as a one-time payment for a lifetime of coverage, and fraud schemes can compromise the individual’s access to this benefit.

Regulatory updates and strategies aimed at combating lab fraud

Preventing lab fraud is crucial to maintaining the integrity of scientific research and the functioning of healthcare systems. Lab fraud can be prevented, or at least significantly diminished, by establishing comprehensive compliance programs, stringent licensing and certification requirements for labs and healthcare providers, encouraging employees and stakeholders in labs and healthcare organizations to report any suspected fraud incidences, education, secured data handling, continuous monitoring, improved medical billing processes, and enforcing penalties and legal consequences.

In January 2023, the US government updated compliance and regulatory requirements for laboratories to prevent lab fraud. As per the updates, the laboratories must submit a medical necessity document supporting the ordered test, progress note, and the treating doctor’s signature to support a claim.

Also, providing incentives to physicians to encourage them to refer patients for lab services will be considered a violation of the federal Anti-Kickback Statute, and both laboratory and healthcare professionals will face legal consequences.

Laboratories that fail to adhere to lab billing guidelines published through National Coverage Determinations (NCDs) or Local Coverage Determinations (LCDs) will face civil liability and triple damages under the False Claims Act.

The government also continued its scrutiny of medically unnecessary genetic testing schemes, audited genetic labs, and tried to recoup funds where the medical necessity requirement was unmet. Also, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) issued a fraud alert warning the public about the proliferation of COVID-19 testing and genetic testing scams.

Moreover, in June 2023, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) took a crucial measure to regulate an extensive array of laboratory tests, including prenatal genetic screenings, to ensure test result accuracy and prevent unreliable outcomes. The US FDA ensures that the lab test delivers results as claimed by the lab test developer by analyzing the device’s accuracy, specificity, clinical characteristics, and analytical sensitivity. Regulating these laboratory tests will likely reduce the chances of fraud, as laboratories will not be allowed to run specific tests if they are not cleared or approved by the FDA.

EOS Perspective

Increased awareness about genetic testing and its easy accessibility have made it more vulnerable to lab fraud in the country. Genetic testing scams are evolving significantly wherein the scammers (a lab owner or a genetic testing company’s representative) are offering free screening, cheek swabs, or testing kits for genetic testing to get the individual’s Medicare information and submit claims. An increase in the number of genetic testing companies manufacturing direct-to-consumer genetic testing kits is expected to further contribute to genetic testing fraud as it will become easier for lab owners to get access to genetic testing kits and scam Medicare beneficiaries.

Also, the introduction of new tests creates potential opportunities for lab fraud as the lack of proper oversight and safeguards makes it easier for lab fraudsters to exploit gaps while appropriate regulatory norms for those tests are being developed. Thus, there is an increased need to set the regulatory norms for any new tests being developed before they are put to use.

While various compliance and regulatory measures are in place to prevent lab fraud, ethical practices, education, and training for lab employees will likely play a significant role in preventing lab fraud in the country. Many healthcare professionals are often involved between doctors prescribing the test and the persons administering the test. Thus, it becomes challenging to determine whether the referrals are conducted efficiently.

In addition, strong collaboration among healthcare insurers, healthcare providers, and the government can also help prevent this kind of fraud. The government plays a vital role here, as it has the tools to lay more emphasis on continuous monitoring and auditing of genetic testing labs to keep track of lab activities and prevent fraud cases.

by EOS Intelligence EOS Intelligence No Comments

Future of Animal Medicine Will Be 3D-printed

Additive manufacturing, better known as 3D printing, attracted the attention of various healthcare sectors, as it has wide applications and provides beneficial results due to its extensive flexibility and customization. 3D printing is becoming more popular in veterinary medicine owing to its revolutionary ability to build a 3D model of many objects using computer-aided design (CAD) software and successfully utilizing it in animal health ranging from implants to prostheses to tissue replacements. The 3D printing market in animal medicine is therefore projected to witness considerable growth, predicted at 15.24% CAGR during the forecast period of 2023-2031. Like almost all technologies, 3D printing in veterinary medicine has its advantages and a few challenges that need consideration.

3D printing technology is rapidly growing, including in veterinary medicine, as it continues to improve and become more accessible. Veterinarians are largely utilizing 3D printing technology because of the transformative approach it offers, while the decreasing cost of printers makes it feasible to develop the most desired model easily within a relatively short period of time.

3D printing finds application in a range of animal care areas

3D printing is a promising technology used to improve animal health and life span by treating disabilities developed due to events such as accidents or other medical conditions. Given its versatility, 3D printing in veterinary medicine is used for a broad range of applications.

Animal prosthetics and orthotics

In veterinary prosthetics and orthotics, 3D printing is used mainly for the development of bone structures, complex implants, and surgical guides. One of the first cases of 3D-printed prosthetics used in an animal was noted in the USA, where Derby, the dog, was born with short forelegs and no front paws, making him unable to walk. In December 2014, with the use of 3D scanning software, Derby was equipped with 3D-printed prosthetics, allowing him to start running and walking freely. Other notable cases of successful 3D-printed prosthetics applications in animals include Romina, a whippet who lost her leg in an accident in 2016. Her leg was fitted with a 3D-printed limb by specialists at Mexico City’s Veterinary Hospital, allowing the dog to walk again.

3D printing in surgical models planning

3D printing technology is ideal for surgical model planning since it allows surgeons to examine and determine bone structures based on a visual examination as the initial stage in surgical planning. Vets can directly quantify the deformity by doing preoperative assessments, however, sometimes, visual inspection of complex bone conformation might be challenging. Furthermore, 3D printing technology in surgical planning is a useful resource to help pet owners better understand their animals’ health issues and planned treatment options.

Future of Animal Medicine Will Be 3D-printed by EOS Intelligence

Future of Animal Medicine Will Be 3D-printed by EOS Intelligence

Education and training

3D printing is one of the most practical and efficient methods for the production of exact anatomic models needed at learning and training facilities across all levels of the veterinary education system. Students can examine and practice on realistic models, gaining a better understanding of complex anatomical structures and surgical techniques. This technology enhances the learning experience and prepares future veterinarians for various scenarios. The list of universities that use 3D printing in their veterinary medicine program is long and expanding and currently includes US-based institutions such as Ohio State University, University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania State University, Cornell University, North Carolina State, University of Tennessee, as well as University of Nottingham and University of Derby in the UK, Satbayev University in Kazakhstan, Indian Veterinary Research Institute and Tamil Nadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University in India, University of Ghent in Belgium, Utrecht University in the Netherlands, University of Bern in Switzerland, University of Glasgow in Scotland, and University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna in Austria, to name a few.

3D printing implants

Implants developed using 3D printing technology are customized to enhance the quality of an animal’s life and are particularly useful in oncological cases, where massive excision requires implant structures to replace removed tissues and restore their functions. A wide range of implants has been created utilizing common biocompatible materials such as titanium and nylon, which have demonstrated a considerable success rate in a variety of complex procedures ranging from skull flap and limb replacement to tibial tuberosity advancement implants. To create medical implants, veterinarians employ powder bed fusion, a metal 3D printing method, which allows them to create implants in a variety of desirable shapes and structures.

3D-printed masks

3D-printed masks are useful and essential to cure wounds from surgery and help to recover from fractures and bone destruction. The 3D-printed mask helps animals recover from injuries without the risk of reopening a wound or dislocating their bones. In August 2017, a female black-breasted leaf turtle in Tennessee suffered a wound on one of her nostrils and was having difficulty eating. To permanently repair the damage, a 3D-printed face mask was created to cover the whole wound region without blocking eyesight or limiting her ability to move her head.

Dynamic drivers power global 3D printing market growth in animal medicine

The global 3D printing in veterinary medicine market size is expected to increase from USD 2.8 billion to USD 11 billion and is estimated to grow by 15.24% CAGR during the forecast period of 2023-2031.

The North American market is expected to be the leading market due to high animal adoption rates, increased pet expenditures, and the abundance of veterinary facilities and clinics in the region. The European market is expected to be the second most prominent, with an increase in the number of experienced veterinarians and R&D investment, particularly in animal health, factors that are likely to drive market expansion. The Asia Pacific market is experiencing a moderate growth rate and is expected to continue showing promising growth in the coming years. This can be attributed to the increasing trend of pet adoption, particularly in countries such as Japan and Australia, where owning a pet is viewed as a symbol of social status. Australia has the highest pet ownership rate in the world, with 63% of the population owning a pet.

The major growth factors that are globally boosting 3D printing in veterinary medicine include wide applications in animal care as the technology enables the creation of patient-specific solutions and a cost-effective approach that varies from a few hundred to around a thousand dollars, which is less than traditional manufacturing methods for veterinary implants. Rapid prototyping is another major growth driver for 3D printing since it allows veterinarians and researchers to quickly prototype and test ideas, resulting in more efficient development procedures. 3D printing also improves patient outcomes by providing personalized solutions that result in better-fitting prosthetics, implants, and devices, which can improve an animal’s quality of life and overall health.

Extensive R&D efforts contribute to the market players’ growth

The global 3D printing market in veterinary medicine is competitive and includes a diverse range of established and startup companies that are actively contributing to advancements in veterinary care. Among the companies providing 3D printing solutions in animal medicine, some of the few leading players include Formlabs, Materialise, Med Dimensions, VET 3D, BTech Innovation, M3D ILAB, DeiveDesign, and Cabiomede. Given the relatively early stage of development that the market is currently at, it is not surprising that R&D plays a vital role in most players’ operations and growth. Many players work toward offering more comprehensive solutions to end-user entities through strategic agreements, partnerships, and acquisitions.

3D Systems Corporation, headquartered in the USA, is considered the leading manufacturing company in this market. It provides medical and dental solutions, as well as veterinary applications. 3D Systems provides a diverse array of products and services that have been used to produce anatomical models, implants, prosthetics, and surgical guides for animals. The company uses various 3D printing technologies such as film-transfer imaging, SLA, SLS, and direct metal printing. It outsources certain printer assembly, printer production, and refurbishment activities to selected organizations and suppliers. With the advancing technological changes in 3D printing, the company claims to have been focusing on ongoing R&D programs to develop new and enhance existing printers and printing materials.

Another market leader is Stratasys, an American-Israeli manufacturer with a global presence in the 3D printing industry for animal medicine. The company offers a range of 3D printing solutions, including 3D printers, materials, Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), and PolyJet technologies. These technologies have been effectively utilized in veterinary medicine to create patient-specific models and surgical guidance for preoperative planning. Stratasys is another player that claims to put investment in R&D to the forefront, to broaden its capabilities and offerings in the veterinary field. The company collaborates with hospitals and universities, such as Colorado State University’s veterinary hospital and AniCura, a European network of animal hospitals and clinics, to advance the use of 3D printing in animal care and creating patient-specific implants. They have been actively integrating this technology into their veterinary practices.

Materialise is a provider of 3D printing software solutions and complex 3D plastic printing services for animal medicine. It employs technologies such as FDM, Multi-Jet Modeling (MJM), and vacuum casting. The company provides custom implants, 3D visualization, and orthotics surgical solutions. Materialize supplies to veterinary research institutes, hospitals, and major medical device manufacturing companies. The company’s software section offers software-based applications and related technology, such as CAD packages and 3D scanners. It has a strong presence in the Americas and offers worldwide coverage to its clients.

Another two companies worth mentioning are VetCT and Wimba. VetCT, a US-based company, specializes in veterinary imaging and has developed expertise in producing 3D reconstructions from a variety of imaging modalities. The company provides 3D modeling and printing services to veterinarians to improve treatment knowledge and planning. Wimba, headquartered in Poland, provides a variety of personalized animal 3D and 4D printed orthopedics items by applying unique measuring techniques and specialized software, resulting in products that are more durable and lightweight.

All these players in the 3D printing market for animal care continue to develop and advance in their specialized product offerings. It can be expected that this specialization will continue and deepen, with the companies trying to carve a unique niche for themselves, especially as the competitiveness in the market is likely to intensify.

A range of challenges continues to put a brake on 3D printing’s mainstream use

3D printing technology has made remarkable advancements in animal medicine, offering immense potential to transform veterinary practices. However, several challenges must be overcome before 3D printing may successfully become main stream in animal treatment.

One of the significant barriers to the adoption of 3D printing technology in clinical practice is its time-consuming nature. The process of creating a replica model and the printing itself are all complicated procedures that can take anywhere from three days to several weeks. This can be a significant challenge for veterinarians who need to provide prompt and effective treatment for their patients.

Creating precise 3D models for printing often relies on medical imaging techniques such as CT scans or MRIs. However, generating high-quality images of animals, especially exotic and small species, can be challenging. Movement during scanning, anesthesia risks, and imaging artifacts can affect the quality of the 3D model. This can lead to inaccuracies in the printed model, leading to ineffective treatment and potential harm to the animal.

The integration of 3D printing into the existing veterinary medicine process presents a significant challenge. The use of 3D printing technology involves a multi-step process, including imaging, model generation, and printing to create anatomical models. Coordination between veterinarians, radiologists, and 3D printing experts is essential to ensure that the process runs smoothly.

The selection of appropriate materials, such as plastics, living cells, titanium, resins, glass, nylon, and metals, is critical for 3D printing in animal medicine, as the availability of materials that offer the required properties, such as biocompatibility and durability for model development is limited and not all materials can be temperature controlled enough to allow 3D printing. Furthermore, many of these printing materials cannot be recycled and are quite unsafe.

The field of animal medicine has greatly benefited from the advancements in 3D printing technology, particularly in the development of personalized implants and prosthetics. However, the diverse anatomies of animals present unique challenges in designing and printing these specialized products. Animals vary greatly in size, shape, and structure, which makes it more complex to create products that fit well and function optimally. This requires specialized skills and software tools such as CAD, as well as a deep understanding of animal anatomy.

In addition to the design and implementation challenges, regulatory authorization is required for the use of 3D-printed products and implants in animal medicine, which includes approval or clearance process, clinical data, post-market surveillance, international harmonization, labeling, and instructions. The safety and efficacy of these products must be thoroughly tested and verified before they can be used in clinical settings.

Furthermore, ethical concerns about the use of animals in medical research must be addressed. It is important to ensure that the use of 3D-printed products and implants does not cause harm or unnecessary suffering to animals. Ensuring the long-term biocompatibility of 3D-printed implants and prosthetics in animals also requires thorough testing and monitoring. Animals have distinct physiological reactions and potential differences in healing processes that must be considered. The use of 3D-printed products must be carefully evaluated to ensure that they do not cause adverse effects or complications

EOS Perspective

3D printing technology has emerged as a promising area in veterinary medicine, providing customized solutions for a wide range of animal health issues. Despite facing some challenges, the technology’s ongoing advancements and increased accessibility are expected to drive significant growth in the market in the future.

With its ability to fabricate precise, patient-specific implants, prostheses, and tissue replacements, 3D printing has the potential to revolutionize veterinary medicine, enhancing outcomes and improving the quality of life for animals. Incorporating 3D printing into animal medicine requires collaboration among veterinary doctors, imaging specialists, 3D printing experts, regulatory authorities, and ethicists.

Nevertheless, there is still a significant amount of work to be done, and addressing these challenges will require substantial effort, innovative solutions, and thoughtful consideration. This is a dynamic and promising field that beckons thorough exploration, continued innovation, and the unwavering commitment of professionals to enhance the global standard of animal care. While the full extent of 3D printing’s impact on veterinary medicine remains to be seen as research and development continue, the initial outcomes are undoubtedly encouraging.

by EOS Intelligence EOS Intelligence 1 Comment

Commentary: The Promise of Comprehensive Genomic Profiling in the USA

Comprehensive Genomic Profiling (CGP) is a diagnostic tool that sequences a patient’s tumor DNA to identify genetic mutations that drive cancer growth. Insurance coverage for CGP varies widely depending on the type of cancer, the patient’s stage of disease, and the specific test being used.  Despite CGP’s tremendous potential to transform cancer care and diagnosis, its implementation is hindered by inconsistent insurance coverage policies.

Comprehensive genomic profiling is a cutting-edge technology that is revolutionizing cancer diagnosis and treatment. Unlike standard gene testing, which looks at a small number of genes, CGP analyzes thousands of genes across the entire genome. This provides a much more comprehensive picture of genetic mutations that may be driving a patient’s cancer, thereby leading to more personalized and effective treatment options. Despite the benefits of CGP, access to this technology remains limited due to a variety of factors, which include high costs, limited insurance coverage, and regulatory hurdles.

One of the biggest challenges for CGP has been payer acceptability. Payers tend to be cautious about covering CGP because it is a relatively new technology, and there is still some debate about its clinical value and cost-effectiveness.

Private payers in the USA are more likely to cover CGP for patients with rare or complex cancers or for patients who have failed standard therapies, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

In contrast, public payers, such as Medicare, may have more restrictive criteria for coverage and only cover CGP for certain types of cancer or for patients who meet specific clinical criteria. These criteria could include a requirement that CGP tests be performed in Medicare-accredited labs. Other major public payers in the USA, such as Medicaid and Veterans Affairs (VA) health plans, also cover CGP, but each payer has different criteria for coverage. Generally, they require that the test is ordered by a physician and is deemed medically necessary for the patient’s treatment plan.

The lack of coverage makes it financially inaccessible for many patients, which limits the ability of healthcare providers to consistently offer CGP testing. This presents a significant obstacle to the widespread adoption of this promising diagnostic tool. Some payers are hesitant to reimburse CGP due to concerns about the cost-effectiveness of the test and the lack of long-term data on clinical outcomes. However, major public and private payers such as Medicare, UnitedHealth (UHC), Aetna, and Cigna, among others, have included CGP tests in their health policies in recent years, nonetheless, the coverage remains uneven.

Cost and regulatory hurdles are stifling the growth of CGP

Payers have historically covered traditional testing, such as immunohistochemistry (IHC), fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and single gene tests, but have been hesitant to provide coverage for CGP. This is mainly because these tests have been around for longer than CGP, so payers are more familiar with them and are more comfortable covering them.

Another reason is that CGP is more expensive than traditional tests. While the exact cost varies depending on the specific test and lab performing it, the cost of CGP tests can range from a few hundred dollars to several thousand dollars, while traditional tests are typically in the range of a few hundred dollars. This is due to the fact that CGP tests are more complex as they analyze a large number of genes, whereas traditional tests focus on analyzing one specific gene at a time, making them less expensive.

According to a study published in 2021 by the Journal of Clinical Oncology, CGP could improve overall survival by about 6% (0.06 years, a relatively small but meaningful amount of time for cancer patients and their families) for US$9,000 per patient, compared with traditional testing strategies. On the other hand, as per a 2022 article by the American Journal of Managed Care, although the cost of CGP tests is high, these tests can help identify the most effective treatment options for each patient, which can lead to better outcomes and fewer unnecessary treatments, which in turn can lower overall healthcare costs.


Read our related Perspective:
 Commentary: Genetic Testing Fraud – The Next Big Concern for the US Healthcare?

 

To further educate the industry about the benefits associated with CGP, Illumina, a California-based biotechnology company, established Access to Comprehensive Genomic Profiling (ACGP) in 2020, which is an alliance of seven members, including leading molecular diagnostics companies, pharmaceutical manufacturers, and laboratories. ACGP aims to educate about CGP for advanced cancer patients by engaging directly with the US payers.

Additionally, a few strategies are being adopted by the healthcare industry, such as bundling CGP tests with other diagnostic tests to reduce the overall cost per test. This way, instead of running a CGP test and a separate test for a specific genetic mutation, both tests could be combined into one-panel tests. This could reduce the overall cost per test by eliminating the need to run two separate tests, as well as reducing the need for multiple lab visits and samples. However, it’s important to note that the savings may vary depending on the specific tests and the laboratory.

The ambiguity surrounding reimbursement for CGP tests among the insurers also stems from the FDA’s ongoing debate over proper classification and regulatory framework for these tests. While the FDA recognizes the potential benefits of CGP, concerns linger about its quality, accuracy, and cost-effectiveness. To address these concerns, the FDA has been working with stakeholders to establish reimbursement policies that make CGP tests accessible to patients. These stakeholders range from academic institutions (such as Mayo Clinic and Memorial Sloan Kettering) to health insurance companies (such as UnitedHealthcare and Aetna) to CGP test developers (such as Guardant Health and Foundation Medicine).

Payers’ coverage for CGP is expanding but is highly uneven

Payers, such as Aetna and Cigna, have included CGP tests in their health plans but do not cover all types of cancers. While an increasing number of payers is expanding coverage for CGP, there is a lot of variation in terms of what is covered and for which types or stages of cancer.

For instance, Aetna announced in 2020 that it would cover CGP testing for certain types of breast and colorectal cancer. However, the coverage for each type of cancer gene mutation is different.

While Aetna’s policies for CGP coverage are very nuanced, Cigna’s are complicated. Cigna’s coverage varies depending on the type of CGP test being ordered, whether the test is considered medically necessary for the patient’s condition, patient’s location, and sometimes the patient needs to meet certain criteria to be eligible for coverage (e.g., only advanced stage of cancer is considered under coverage).

Similarly, UHC, one of the leading private health plan providers in the USA, also limited its CGP coverage to patients with advanced cancers, such as lung, breast, or colorectal cancer. However, in early 2023, UHC issued a new policy expanding coverage for CGP tests from Foundation Medicine and Guardant Health. The new policy covers CGP tests for a wider range of cancers, including early-stage cancers and other types of tumors. The goal of this policy change is to increase access to CGP testing and to help catch cancer earlier when it is more treatable.

Aetna and Cigna are not far behind in expanding their coverage for CGP tests as well. In 2023, both companies included additional benefits for members receiving CGP testing, such as on-site care in some facilities and counseling services.

There’s an increasing recognition that CGP can help identify patients who may benefit from targeted therapies. Overall, payers are becoming more open to covering CGP, but there is still variability in their policies and coverage levels.

EOS Perspective

The adoption of CGP is creating a ripple effect throughout the healthcare industry. Payers are increasingly recognizing the value of CGP tests and expanding their coverage. By providing broader coverage for CGP tests, payers can position themselves as offering more cutting-edge care options. This can give them a competitive edge over other insurers who may not provide coverage for these tests. In addition, by broadening the coverage of tests for early-stage cancer, payers can help to identify and treat cancers earlier, which can lead to better outcomes for patients and potentially lower costs in the long run.

Further, the growing adoption of CGP has an impact on healthcare industry stakeholders beyond payers. It is likely to fuel a shift towards precision medicine, where treatments are tailored to the individual patient based on genetic information.

Diagnostic companies are likely to invest in CGP technology to stay competitive and offer more comprehensive tests. For healthcare providers, offering CGP tests allows them to differentiate themselves, improve patient outcomes, and attract more patients. However, it can also add complexity to the treatment process and increase costs if not managed correctly (e.g., wrong interpretation of genetic information due to the large amount of data for individual patients).

For test kit producers and labs, CGP is creating new opportunities for growth and market share but also increased competition and pressure to lower costs and improve accuracy.

Overall, while still not fully embraced by the industry, CGP is shaking up the healthcare landscape, creating both great opportunities and new challenges for all stakeholders.

by EOS Intelligence EOS Intelligence 1 Comment

Medicine Shortage in the EU: A Deep-dive into Its Causes and Cures

With the proposal of the deeply revamped new EU pharma legislation in April 2023, the EU initiated an attempt to tackle the medicine shortfall that the union has been experiencing for over two decades now. Europe has witnessed a 20-fold rise in reported drug shortfalls from 2000 to 2018, as per research conducted by the Mediterranean Institute of Investigative Reporting (MIIR).

According to the European Data Journalism Network (EDJNet), the problem of drug inadequacies is not novel, although it got under the spotlight during the 2020-2022 COVID-19 pandemic, the energy crisis that started in early 2022, and the beginning of the Russian invasion of Ukraine in early 2022. Ironically, the fundamental reasons responsible for the medicine shortages in the EU are not solely these three events but a mixture of structural, economic, and regulatory factors that the governments often refuse to agree on.

In terms of the magnitude of the shortage during the five-year period from January 2018 to March 2023, Italy experienced the highest inadequacy in absolute terms to the tune of 10,843 medicines, followed by Czechia with 2,699 medicines and Germany with 2,355 medicines. Although Greece witnessed the lowest shortage, with 389 medicines between 2018 and 2023, the median duration for which the shortfall existed was the longest for this country, with 130 days, followed by Germany with 120 days, and Belgium with 103 days. This means that, for instance, in Greece, it is likely to take about four months and eight days for a medicine to be back on the market.

According to a survey regarding medicine shortages in the EU members organized by the Pharmaceutical Group of European Union (PGEU) between mid-November and end-December 2022, all 29 EU countries surveyed recorded drug shortfalls during the past 12 months among community pharmacists (pharmacists in retail pharmacies where the general populations have access to medications). Moreover, around 76% of the respondents agreed that the situation had worsened compared to 2021, and the remaining 24% said the situation remained the same compared to 2021. Not a single country registered any improvement in the situation compared to 2021. Furthermore, the survey also revealed that 83% of the respondents concurred that cardiovascular drugs were in short supply during the last 12 months in community pharmacies, followed by medicines treating nervous system diseases and anti-infectives for systemic use, such as antibiotics (79% each). Owing to the sample size of this survey of 1 response per country covering 29 EU countries, the findings might not be accurate but are likely to illustrate the overall trends correctly.

The problem of medicine shortages is not just limited to EU countries, as the UK is also experiencing acute drug inadequacies, including HRT (hormone replacement therapy) medicines and antibiotics, among other medicines.

In December 2022, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) announced that most EU countries are confronted with drug shortages. The question that arises is what led to the medicine shortfall in the EU and how the EU members can attempt to combat the issue at hand.

Medicine Shortage in the EU A Deep-dive into Its Causes and Cures by EOS Intelligence

Medicine Shortage in the EU: A Deep-dive into Its Causes and Cures by EOS Intelligence

Factors responsible for medicine shortages in the EU

The attributing factors to drug shortages in the EU are mainly a combination of economic, regulatory, and production or supply chain-related causes.

Economic factors

Price cap regulation on generics amidst rising costs hindering production

One of the key reasons for the drug shortfall of medicines, including antibiotics (such as Amoxicillin) in the EU is the fact that generic drug makers are not paid sufficiently for increased production of the medicine to cover the associated costs such as production, logistics, and regulatory compliance costs that are rising steeply.

To add to the woes of most European generic drug makers, the prices of the generics that the respective countries had set have remained unchanged for the past two decades, making the situation much worse.

Additionally, due to regulated prices of generic drugs, numerous European drug producers have shown a lack of interest in boosting their production capacity. This has become particularly relevant during the Russian invasion of Ukraine, which has caused a rise in energy costs. This cost increase affects the smooth functioning of factories that produce everything from aluminum for medicine bottle caps to cardboard for packaging medicines, indicating a rise in drug insufficiencies in the foreseeable future.

According to a Reuters report, six European generic drug industry groups and trade associations, as well as 13 European producers, revealed that many smaller drug makers are battling to be profitable and, therefore, are contemplating if producing antibiotics would be feasible, let alone expanding production capacity.

Government tenders indirectly force generic producers to cut production

Before inviting quotations or tenders, many European governments tend to weigh the generic drug prices with prices in other regional markets or prices of similar drugs in the home market to establish a reference price point that can be used in negotiating with producers. These governments give contracts to those producers who quote the lowest price, resulting in “further downward pressure on prices in subsequent tenders,” as per generic drug producers.

According to many European generic drug producers, the price cap regulation and the tender system of generics have spurred a ‘race to the bottom’. The European generic drug makers bear the brunt of Asian generic drug producers charging less for the same products. Consequently, some European firms were compelled to either decrease production or choose offshore production (of generics and APIs required to produce them) to low-cost locations such as India and China.

Parallel exports aggravate the shortages in low-price markets

Although some European countries have started prohibiting parallel exports (cross-border sale of medicines within the EU by sellers outside of the producer’s distribution system and without the producer’s permission) to other countries, this practice of buying drugs from low-price markets and selling them in high-price markets has resulted in the exhaustion of medicine supplies in low-price markets. This has been noticed in some EU countries such as Greece, Portugal, and Central and Eastern European member states where legislations have been put into effect that make the re-export of pharmaceuticals harder. For instance, drug shortages in Greece have been attributed to the re-export of imported medicines to regions where these medicines are sold at a higher price point than in Greece, as per a news report by the Turkish news agency, Anadolu Agency.

According to a report published by the Centers for European Policy Network in May 2021, the magnitude of parallel imports of medicines occurring in the European Economic Area (EEA) was to the tune of €5.7 billion in 2019. Furthermore, the share of parallel-imported pharmaceuticals varied considerably across European countries. To cite a few examples, Denmark’s share of parallel-imported pharmaceuticals was around 26.2% in 2018, while the corresponding figure for Austria was 1.9% in the same year. Similarly, in 2018, the share of parallel-imported medicines was around 12% in Sweden and 2% in Poland.

Production and supply chain factors

The current lack of a sufficient number of production facilities in European countries can increase the chances of drug shortfalls in the region at the time of any production problem. To illustrate this, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) cited that drug shortages in the EU are caused by production factors, raw material shortages, distribution issues, and high demand due to respiratory diseases and inadequate manufacturing capacities.

Furthermore, many pharma producers utilize the just-in-time concept of inventory management, which improves efficiency, reduces storage costs, and minimizes waste, thanks to producing goods as needed. Due to this, producers often face challenges such as the inability to adapt to changing demand volumes.

Moreover, owing to the innate reliance of drug producers on APIs, variations in the “supply, quality, and regulation” of APIs have affected medicine supplies, according to a report by the Economist Intelligence Unit. To cite an example, pharmacies in Italy have attributed the decline in the making of APIs in China to the shortfall of medicines in Italy, according to a report by Anatolia Agency, the leading Turkish news agency.

Reactions from various stakeholders in the EU pharma market

Starting from proposing a revision of the EU pharma legislation to banning parallel exports of medicines in some European countries, there are many reactions to drug shortages in the EU from various pharma market stakeholders.

New Pharma legislation in the EU by the European Commission

The proposal of the new pharma legislation in the EU by the European Commission in April 2023 came as a reaction to the acute medicine shortage in the region. It proposes measures for producers to provide early warnings of drug shortfalls and necessitates producers to keep reserve supplies in sufficient quantities for times of crisis, such as acute shortages.


Read our related Perspective:
 New EU Pharma Legislation: Is It a Win-win for All Stakeholders?

Price capping cannot facilitate sustainability

European lobby groups supporting generic medicine makers argue that price limits won’t be effective due to growing production and regulatory expenses. There was no system to review medicine prices and adjust them for inflation or when APIs became scarce in most European countries. Moreover, it is exceedingly complex to continue to keep medicines competitive after 10 years of their launch.

Ramped up production by bigger generic drug producers

The pricing framework in Europe is the primary concern of generic drug makers in the long term, not production costs. According to the global supply chain head of Sandoz, Novartis’s generic division, the current inflexible pricing framework prevents generic drug producers from adjusting prices for essential drugs according to changes in input costs.

To illustrate this, the price of 60ml of pediatric amoxicillin in 2003 in Spain was around €0.98 (US$1.05). In the following ten years, the only change that was made was to reduce the quantity of the medicine to 40ml of pediatric amoxicillin, still pricing it at €0.98 (US$1.05). However, no change has been made since 2013.

Some larger generic drug companies are ramping up the production of certain medicines, such as amoxicillin, that are in short supply. To cite a few examples, Sandoz is planning to add extra shifts in its factory in Austria to meet their increased production target of amoxicillin by a double-digit percentage in 2023 vis-à-vis 2022. Additionally, the company plans to start the operation of another expanded factory by 2024. Similarly, GSK also recruited a new workforce and increased shifts in its amoxicillin factories in the UK and France. However, for companies with smaller market shares, such as Teva, things are different as increasing production capacity is not a viable option for them as they are struggling to be profitable, and thus, there is no way they can ramp up production to bridge the market gap.

National governments and drug regulators making big changes

Some European governments are considering making legal changes to ease the current procurement system of medicines in their respective regions. Additionally, some European governments are also striving to ban the re-export of imported medicines. Germany’s government is set to contemplate making legal changes to its tender system for generic medicines in 2023, whereas the Spanish government is planning to review its pricing scheme for certain medicines, which might cause patients to pay a higher price for medicines, including amoxicillin, on a temporary basis. The Netherlands and Sweden have put in place a law that requires vendors to stock six weeks of reserve supplies to mitigate shortfalls.

Several European countries are taking initiatives to prohibit parallel exports or re-exports of imported medicines to preserve domestic medicine supplies. To cite an example, in November 2022, the medicines regulatory body in Greece expanded the list of drugs whose re-export to other countries is prohibited. Another example is Romania, which halted exports of certain antibiotics and pediatric analgesics for three months in January 2023. Also, in January 2023, Belgium issued an official order allowing the respective authorities to stop the export of medicines to other countries during crises such as shortages.

EOS Perspective

Tender or procurement and pricing strategies of medicines in the EU and the UK must be improved after in-depth analysis. This is the only way to improve production in the European region so that future shortages of drugs can be avoided, in addition to curbing heavy dependence on Asia for essential drugs.

Secondly, there needs to be a centralized EU system in place that is designed to track the supply of essential medicines in all member countries, allowing for the identification of early signs of upcoming risks or shortfalls.

The new pharma legislation in the EU is expected to help improve the availability of drugs in situations of health crises, including drug shortages. The EU could reduce medicine shortages across the region over time as it has awarded the EMA more responsibilities and established a new body called HERA that can purchase medicines for the entire union.

by EOS Intelligence EOS Intelligence No Comments

Commentary: CVS Moves to Home-based Care with Acquisition of Signify Health

Retail health companies increasingly invest in primary care, particularly home-based care, with patients demanding low-cost and convenient care delivery. The recent acquisition of home healthcare company Signify Health by retail health giant CVS Health highlights the industry’s growing interest in home-based care.

There is an increased demand for at-home healthcare services and health assessments, especially after the COVID-19 pandemic changed customer preferences towards access to convenient at-home services.

At-home care can bring down expenses by reducing hospital visits and detecting health problems in advance. A study published by the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality in April 2021 indicated that at-home patient care could reduce hospital expenses by 32% and hospital readmission rate (within six months after discharge) by 52%. The study claimed that patients receiving at-home care were less exposed to other illnesses, and this kind of care provided consistent attention, which resulted in better management of chronic diseases and prevention of health problems, reducing hospital readmissions. Apart from lowering the overall cost of care, healthcare providers are also incentivized to lower readmission rates under Medicare incentive programs, and hence, many healthcare companies have realized the potential of investing in at-home services.

One example of this was CVS Health’s acquisition of home health company Signify Health, completed in March 2023, for a total value of US$8 billion. Signify’s network of 10,000 clinicians, nationwide healthcare providers, and proprietary analytics and technology platforms is expected to help CVS extend its at-home health business. Adding Signify’s capabilities, such as at-home healthcare services, health assessments, patient data analytics, Accountable Care Organization (ACO) management, and provider enablement solutions, is likely to strengthen CVS’s abilities to offer better accessibility to services, improved patient-provider connectivity, better coordination of services, and improved quality of services.

CVS increases focus on the Medicare population with at-home health offerings

Looking at the recent acquisitions in the healthcare industry, it can be seen that major players in the retail health space, such as CVS Health, Amazon, Walgreens, Walmart, Dollar General, and Best Buy, are acquiring companies to strengthen their capabilities in offering primary care. These retail health companies are trying to tap into the growing demand for consumer-centric care. In particular, there is an increased focus on senior citizens and patients with chronic diseases.

Almost 19% of the US population is covered under Medicare plans, making it one of the most lucrative segments. In 2022, McKinsey estimated that, by 2025, up to US$265 billion worth of healthcare services provided to traditional Medicare and Medicare Advantage beneficiaries by traditional primary care facilities could potentially navigate to at-home healthcare providers offering at-home health services and virtual primary care services. Retail health companies view primary care services offered at home, traditionally dominated by independent clinics, as an opportunity to enter the healthcare delivery segment. CVS is also heading in the same direction.

CVS Health began expanding beyond its pharmacy services by acquiring health insurance company Aetna in 2018. Aetna is the fourth-largest Medicare Advantage plan, with 3.3 million enrollees in 2023.

In recent years, CVS Health has made significant efforts in building value-based care capabilities. Apart from acquiring Signify Health, which also includes Signify’s Caravan ACO business, the company acquired Medicare-focused primary care provider Oak Street Health in May 2023. These acquisitions indicate CVS’s increasing focus on enhancing healthcare services for the Medicare population.


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Signify’s acquisition brings CVS closer to its aim to become a full-service health provider

With the acquisition of Signify Health, CVS should be able to enter the at-home healthcare space in addition to its existing 9,900 retail drugstores and 1,100 MinuteClinics. CVS now has the capabilities to fulfill patient needs across the entire care spectrum, operating as a payer, a pharmacy benefit manager, an ACO manager, a chain of medical clinics, a network of primary care centers, and a home-based care provider, becoming a full-service healthcare provider.

This means CVS can make it simpler for patients and providers to navigate the complex healthcare system by centralizing services, as all these healthcare activities are performed under the same company. For instance, CVS can offer Medicare Advantage programs to patients, provide home visits, prescribe medicines, which can be delivered by CVS pharmacy, and track patients’ medication intake, which helps in making pharmacy reconciliations and offering follow-up care by primary care centers if needed. CVS can be able to access accurate and real-time data updates from all patient activities, which would improve care coordination and navigation of healthcare services for patients with real-time data sharing with providers.

CVS-Signify synergies can amplify companies’ growth and capabilities

CVS is enhancing digital capabilities to improve interoperability of electronic health records (EHRs) and enable remote patient monitoring. The company has already developed digital capabilities such as automated messaging on prescriptions, appointments, and vaccinations. CVS can integrate these digital capabilities into Signify’s systems to streamline communication between providers and patients.

CVS is expected to make use of Signify’s home care services to introduce at-home health assessments, which is a highly-demanded service by customers. Signify provided over 2.3 million unique at-home health assessments in 2022 and has witnessed a 16% year-on-year increase in the number of at-home assessments in Q2 2023. Using CVS’s nationwide primary care capabilities, Signify Health is likely to be able to expand its reach in the at-home health assessment space.

Signify’s technological capabilities are likely to strengthen CVS’s position in the market as customers appreciate increased convenience, such as remote patient monitoring, data-driven health predictions, and better navigation through the health systems. CVS can also benefit from Signify’s technological capabilities, such as provider enablement tools that would help manage population health, turnkey analytics, and practice improvement solutions to help providers transition to a value-based reimbursement model and improve the quality of care.

Furthermore, CVS also offers payer-agnostic solutions such as virtual primary care and pharmacy benefits management (CVS Caremark). CVS Caremark has the largest market share in the US pharmacy benefits manager market, with a 33% share in 2022. Signify’s client network of 50 health plan clients, including government, other payers, and private employers, can help CVS expand its payer-agnostic solutions to a diverse set of health plan and employer clients.

EOS Perspective

CVS outbid its rivals, such as Amazon, UnitedHealth Group, and Option Care Health to acquire Signify. Having acquired one of the most sought-after home healthcare companies, CVS has strengthened its position in terms of its expanded capabilities, such as primary care, home health, at-home health assessments, and provider enablement solutions. The company has the benefit of a large customer base, being the largest pharmacy chain in the US in 2022, which will help it expand its primary care and at-home services quickly. It will be interesting to see how CVS would be able to direct 8 million senior citizens who walk into CVS pharmacy stores annually to Oak Street clinics for a wellness visit or encourage them to schedule a home visit via Signify.

However, the competitors, especially the Medicare Advantage competitors, are not lagging behind. The largest Medicare Advantage Plan, UnitedHealth Group, boasting 8.9 million Medicare Advantage enrollees in 2023, announced the acquisition of two home health companies, LHC Group and Amedisys, this year. Humana, the second largest Medicare Advantage Plan with 5.5 million enrollees in 2023, acquired a stake in Kindred at Home in 2021.

Similar to CVS, UnitedHealth Group and Humana also own pharmacy and provider capabilities (including clinic-based, at-home, and telehealth). All three companies are on the task of deriving synergies among the different businesses they own with the aim to improve patient outcomes and reduce overall costs. To outperform the strong competition, the winning company needs to keep focusing on improving healthcare accessibility and patient experience, as well as catering to the evolving consumer needs.

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